Guidelines & Policies

EU FLAG

Tobacco Products Directive

Overview

The Tobacco Products Directive (2014/40/EU) aims to improve the functioning of the internal market for tobacco and related products, while ensuring a high level of health protection for European citizens. The Directive, which is based on the proposal of the European Commission, entered into force on 19 May 2014 and became applicable in the EU Member States on 20 May 2016. Read more.


EU FLAG

Commission Implementing Acts

Implementing Decision (EU) 2016/586

Overview

Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2016/586 of 14 April 2016 on technical standards for the refill mechanism of electronic cigarettes (notified under document C(2016) 2093). Read more.


Implementing Decision (EU) 2016/786

Overview

Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2016/786 of 18 May 2016 laying down the procedure for the establishment and operation of an independent advisory panel assisting Member States and the Commission in determining whether tobacco products have a characterising flavour. Read more.


Implementing Decision (EU) 2015/2183

Overview

This decision established a common format for the notification of information on electronic cigarettes and refill containers. Read more.

Read the final report

More information:


WHOWHO framework convention on tobacco control

Overview

The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) is the first international treaty negotiated under the auspices of WHO. It was adopted by the World Health Assembly on 21 May 2003 and entered into force on 27 February 2005. It has since become one of the most rapidly and widely embraced treaties in United Nations history.

The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) is an evidence-based treaty that reaffirms the right of all people to the highest standard of health. The WHO FCTC was developed in response to the globalization of the tobacco epidemic. The spread of the tobacco epidemic is facilitated through a variety of complex factors with cross-border effects, including trade liberalization and direct foreign investment. Other factors such as global marketing, transnational tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, and the international movement of contraband and counterfeit cigarettes have also contributed to the explosive increase in tobacco use. Ten years after its ratification by most countries around the world, the health gains triggered by the WHO FCTC are evident, but not sufficient. 

Read more.